Review: Herman Bavinck on Preaching and Preachers

To learn more about Herman Bavinck on Preaching & Preachers, visit our website.

Reformedish

preaching and preachersI allow myself few reviews during the school semester, but I wanted to take a little pause between papers to highlight a new Herman Bavinck book. James P. Eglinton, lecturer in Reformed Theology at New College in Edinburgh and author of the groundbreaking study Trinity and Organism, has just edited and translated a little volume Herman Bavinck on Preaching & Preachers. In it he collects a couple of lectures on the nature of Eloquence, the place of the sermon, reflections on language and preaching in America, as well as a translation of the only published sermon of Bavinck’s we have. (Apparently Bavinck mostly preached from sparse notes, or without any.) Eglinton also includes a helpful short biography of Bavinck as a preacher, introducing the work as a whole.

We ought to be grateful to Eglinton for filling this gap in the literature. Many of us have benefitted from…

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Book Review: Keep Up Your Biblical Hebrew in Two Minutes a Day vol. 1 & 2

Finding Rest in the Haven

Kline, Jonathan G., Keep Up Your Biblical Hebrew in Two Minutes a Day: Vol. 1. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2017. 384 pp.; Hb. $39.95. Link to Hendrickson

Kline, Jonathan G., Keep Up Your Biblical Hebrew in Two Minutes a Day: Vol. 2. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2017. 384 pp.; Hb. $39.95. Link to Hendrickson

Image result for hendrickson two minutes a dayTalk to anyone who studied Biblical languages during their education and I guarantee they will attest to the difficulty of retention post-schooling. Whether at Bible College or Seminary, past or present, it is nigh-impossible to maintain the fundamentals and vocabulary without daily engagement. This becomes more difficult as time grows in scarcity, feeling like you have to relearn the language all over again. In the midst of this challenge comes a reasonable, affordable, and beneficial solution from editor/compiler Dr. Jonathan G. Kline and Hendrickson Publishing— Keep Up Your Biblical Hebrew in Two Minutes a Day: vols…

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Why Did We Choose Rahlfs-Hanhart as the Basis for this Reader’s Edition?

Preorder Septuaginta: A Reader’s Edition on our website! Will be available November 1, 2018.

Septuaginta: A Reader's Edition

books

One of the first decisions we faced in scoping out this project was this: which Greek text should we use?

There were essentially four options on the table:

  1. H. B. Swete’s ‘smaller’ Cambridge edition from the late 1800s–early 1900s
  2. Brooke/McLean/Thackeray’s ‘larger’ Cambridge critical edition
  3. The semi-critical Septuaginta edited by Alfred Rahlfs and revised by Robert Hanhart (a.k.a. Rahlfs-Hanhart)
  4. The Göttingen critical edition

The first option is in the public domain and available electronically (e.g., here), which was a plus, but all agree it has been supplanted by others. The second option is also publically available (e.g., here) but unfortunately the original project was never completed.

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Review: A Mentor’s Wisdom by Larry Moyer

“This is a special kind of book. It’s not hard to read. In fact, you may find it relaxing. By that I don’t mean it’s fluffy in any way, but that it’s reflective. Larry Moyer reflects on things he picked up from his mentor, Haddon Robinson, and it’s a journey that will likely help you reflect on your own life.”

The Reagan Review

Book mentor.jpg

This is a special kind of book. It’s not hard to read. In fact, you may find it relaxing. By that I don’t mean it’s fluffy in any way, but that it’s reflective. Larry Moyer reflects on things he picked up from his mentor, Haddon Robinson, and it’s a journey that will likely help you reflect on your own life. If you happen to be a preacher like both the author and his subject, the scope of your ponderings will be even greater.

Admittedly, a book of this design would have little hope of success unless it had what this one does – a full-orbed life with Christ where both a deep immersion into the Bible and a life of trying with all its trial and error. Mr. Robinson is just such a man. Mr. Moyer had decades of interaction with Mr. Robinson and he was able to strike the…

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Carta’s Newest Maps: Jerusalem: Biblical Archaeology and Israel: Biblical Archaeology

By Amy Paulsen-Reed, Sales Representative and Assistant Editor Jerusalem: Biblical Archaeology The Backstory Soon after I became the liaison between Carta Jerusalem and Hendrickson Publishers (Hendrickson distributes Carta’s products in the US), I started hearing about an exciting new map of archaeological sites in Jerusalem they were working on: Jerusalem: Biblical Archaeology. They said they … Continue reading Carta’s Newest Maps: Jerusalem: Biblical Archaeology and Israel: Biblical Archaeology

Learning from Haddon Robinson’s Legacy: An Excerpt from A Mentor’s Wisdom

Through his distinguished career as a pastor, professor, and theologian, Dr. Haddon Robinson (1931–2017) mentored and raised up many powerful men and women of God. In a moving tribute to him, Dr. R. Larry Moyer, founder and CEO of EvanTell, reflects on the forty-five most significant lessons he learned from his friend and mentor in … Continue reading Learning from Haddon Robinson’s Legacy: An Excerpt from A Mentor’s Wisdom

Review: A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs

“I recommend this volume for its thoroughness. The breadth and depth of topics covered is immense. This is fantastic for a time period we do not know much (or enough!) about.”

For more information about A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs, check out our website as well as the below review!

The Blog of a Wanna-Be Pastor

A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs is of immense value to the student of the history of Christianity and what early Christians believed. Debates continue today about what these early Christians believed. No doubt scholarship has progressed in this field, for which I am thankful. Yet, people always look for the “classics” to possess on one’s bookshelf. For example, Karl Barth’s Dogmatics is a classic in Protestantism. Or for our Catholic friends, volumes of Aquinas’s Summa. For a more conservative, Calvinistic Reformed position, Charles Hodge’s Systematic Theology or Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics top the field. In the study of early Christianity and what they believed, there are few volumes I would recommend, but this is one of them.

First, I recommend this volume for its thoroughness. The breadth and depth of topics covered is immense. This is fantastic for a time period we do not know much (or enough!)…

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How to Keep Your Languages in Just 2 Minutes a Day

Derek’s review is concise and highlights all the important things to be noted about the Two Minutes a Day Biblical Languages series! Check it out:

Reformedish

keep biblical greekI will let you in on a little secret today: I am not, by nature, a language guy. I know, I know. All ministry people, theologians, students of Scripture are supposed to be delighted at the intricacies of Greek and Hebrew and the wonders it can unlock. And, well, I am. Kind of. I do enjoy finding linguistic links in passages which can get obscured in translation, or puns, alliteration, or having a better handle on the way the particular construction of a verb might impact the sense of a Pauline injunction. There are reasons for pastors and theologians to know the original, Biblical languages.

But when it comes to it, languages are not something I naturally find myself wanting to practice or study on my own in the same way I study systematics, church history, or broad biblical theology.

Which is probably part of why I lost most of…

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Review: Biblia Germanica 1545

Ayuda Ministerial/Resources for Ministry

9781619708945oNow that the Protestant world has celebrated the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, it is a wonderful occasion to review the Biblia Germanica 1545 (Hendrickson, 2017). This volume is a replica of the 1545 Luther Bible, and of course, it is written in German.

Luther wrote many volumes, but none of them has the value and relevance of the translation of the Latin Bible to German language. That allowed people from German Speaking countries to read the Bible in their own langue. We have to consider the risk Luther faced at that time by translating the Bible from Latin to German. Thanks to his braveness and determination the door for other translation to different common languages opened. Now we can say the Bible is the most translated book in the world. Even minorities can read the Bible in their native language.

The Biblia Germanica 1545 comes in a box that…

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Sneak Peek at Herman Bavinck on Preaching & Preachers

Want a sneak peek at James Eglinton’s Herman Bavinck on Preaching & Preachers? At this link is a lecture Eglinton gave in 2016 at a Presbytery meeting in York, UK. In it he introduces the listener to Bavinck the preacher  and the connection between Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics and the task of preaching. Some more Herman Bavinck … Continue reading Sneak Peek at Herman Bavinck on Preaching & Preachers