Expand Your Teen’s Understanding of Biblical History with Carta Jerusalem’s Teacher’s Guides

By Sarah Welch, Editorial Assistant In the days of my own homeschooling, early August was when my family and I sat down in earnest to decide what exactly we wanted to be part of my curriculum that year. While I’ve now completed my undergrad with a degree in English, I still feel the pull to … Continue reading Expand Your Teen’s Understanding of Biblical History with Carta Jerusalem’s Teacher’s Guides

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Review: Understanding the Twelve Tribes–A New Carta Resource!

The Reagan Review

book carta 12

This volume is another of the outstanding, profusely illustrated resources published by Carta. At this point, they have several of these large paged (9 X 12”) in a similar design that will provide the opportunity for much pleasurable study for Bible students. This new volume by Menashe Har-El is a fascinating treatment that will open up your thinking to all kinds of new things you didn’t know. The author is a biblical geography expert who has taught and written widely. This work illustrates several biblical passages that only gets a cursory look in other volumes. The word “fascinating” is not an exaggerated description.

The subtitle “Boundaries and Surrounding Nations” articulates the value of this book. After a broad introduction, the geographical division of the land among the tribes at the time of Joshua is explained. Some boundaries were natural landmarks while others were erected with piles of stones or fences. There’s…

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How Science and Faith Coexist: A Review of Faith across the Multiverse

By Maggie Swofford, Marketing & Editorial Assistant As someone whose interests have tended toward the arts and humanities for most of her life, I admit I was somewhat skeptical of the technical nature of the scientific concepts discussed in Andy Walsh’s book Faith across the Multiverse: Parables from Modern Science. What I was surprised to … Continue reading How Science and Faith Coexist: A Review of Faith across the Multiverse

Review: Essential Writings of Meredith G. Kline

“It is a consistent challenge to bring fresh insights to the study of the biblical text without drifting away from orthodoxy. I thought these articles a good example of scholarship that flourished within that tension.”

Read the rest of Bob Trube’s review of Essential Writings of Meredith G. Kline here:

Bob on Books

Essential Writings of Meredith G Kline

Essential Writings of Meredith G. KlineMeredith D. Kline (Foreword, Tremper Longman II; Biography, Meredith M. Kline; Introduction, Jonathan G. Kline). Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2017.

Summary: A collection of articles by Meredith Kline spanning Genesis to Revelation, and the author’s academic career characterized by biblical insight and theological integrity within a Reformed perspective. 

Meredith G. Kline (1922-2007) was a professor of Old Testament perhaps best known for one of his early works, Treaty of the Great King (1963). Drawing on discoveries in Hittite treaty forms, he contended that the structure of Deuteronomy reflects the structure of treaty covenants of the Second Millennium BC, lending support for traditional dating as opposed to a late date at the time of Josiah’s kingship.  He was also author of The Structure of Biblical Authority (1975), an important contribution to the discussion of the doctrine of scripture.

This new collection of articles…

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Book Review: Keep Up Your Biblical Aramaic in Two Minutes a Day

Finding Rest in the Haven

Kline, Jonathan G., Keep Up Your Biblical Aramaic in Two Minutes a Day. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2017. 384 pp.; Hb. $39.95. Link to Hendrickson

Talk to anyone who studied Biblical languages during their education and I guarantee they will attest to the difficulty of retention post-schooling. Whether at Bible College or Seminary, past or present, it is nigh-impossible to maintain the fundamentals and vocabulary without daily engagement. This becomes more difficult as time grows in scarcity, feeling like you have to relearn the language all over again. What is even more difficult is when one is just getting their bearings with a new language entirely. This is where I’m at with Biblical Aramaic. In all the volumes of the Two Minutes a Day series from Hendrickson, Kline clearly emphasizes that this is not meant to replace a grammar, but supplement it. Because I am not taking Aramaic until the…

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Review: The Bible and Archaeology by Richelle

The Reagan Review

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Here’s the perfect book for either pastors or Bible students to get a clear overview of the connection between Bible and archaeology. This book succeeds because it strikes the perfect balance between archaeological detail and basic understanding. In other words, you will not drown in the minutia of archaeology, but you will have an informed grasp of both the value and limitations of archaeology in your Bible studies.

Matthieu Richelle, a respected professor of Old Testament, has a nice list of credentials to be able to produce this work on archaeology. I appreciated his respect of the Bible, his academic integrity, and his civility toward other archaeologists with whom he might disagree. In the same vein, while I might disagree with him on a few points myself, I respect greatly what he has produced here. To take something as complex as archaeological methodology and make it accessible to a popular…

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Review: Herman Bavinck on Preaching and Preachers

To learn more about Herman Bavinck on Preaching & Preachers, visit our website.

Reformedish

preaching and preachersI allow myself few reviews during the school semester, but I wanted to take a little pause between papers to highlight a new Herman Bavinck book. James P. Eglinton, lecturer in Reformed Theology at New College in Edinburgh and author of the groundbreaking study Trinity and Organism, has just edited and translated a little volume Herman Bavinck on Preaching & Preachers. In it he collects a couple of lectures on the nature of Eloquence, the place of the sermon, reflections on language and preaching in America, as well as a translation of the only published sermon of Bavinck’s we have. (Apparently Bavinck mostly preached from sparse notes, or without any.) Eglinton also includes a helpful short biography of Bavinck as a preacher, introducing the work as a whole.

We ought to be grateful to Eglinton for filling this gap in the literature. Many of us have benefitted from…

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Book Review: Keep Up Your Biblical Hebrew in Two Minutes a Day vol. 1 & 2

Finding Rest in the Haven

Kline, Jonathan G., Keep Up Your Biblical Hebrew in Two Minutes a Day: Vol. 1. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2017. 384 pp.; Hb. $39.95. Link to Hendrickson

Kline, Jonathan G., Keep Up Your Biblical Hebrew in Two Minutes a Day: Vol. 2. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2017. 384 pp.; Hb. $39.95. Link to Hendrickson

Image result for hendrickson two minutes a dayTalk to anyone who studied Biblical languages during their education and I guarantee they will attest to the difficulty of retention post-schooling. Whether at Bible College or Seminary, past or present, it is nigh-impossible to maintain the fundamentals and vocabulary without daily engagement. This becomes more difficult as time grows in scarcity, feeling like you have to relearn the language all over again. In the midst of this challenge comes a reasonable, affordable, and beneficial solution from editor/compiler Dr. Jonathan G. Kline and Hendrickson Publishing— Keep Up Your Biblical Hebrew in Two Minutes a Day: vols…

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Review: A Mentor’s Wisdom by Larry Moyer

“This is a special kind of book. It’s not hard to read. In fact, you may find it relaxing. By that I don’t mean it’s fluffy in any way, but that it’s reflective. Larry Moyer reflects on things he picked up from his mentor, Haddon Robinson, and it’s a journey that will likely help you reflect on your own life.”

The Reagan Review

Book mentor.jpg

This is a special kind of book. It’s not hard to read. In fact, you may find it relaxing. By that I don’t mean it’s fluffy in any way, but that it’s reflective. Larry Moyer reflects on things he picked up from his mentor, Haddon Robinson, and it’s a journey that will likely help you reflect on your own life. If you happen to be a preacher like both the author and his subject, the scope of your ponderings will be even greater.

Admittedly, a book of this design would have little hope of success unless it had what this one does – a full-orbed life with Christ where both a deep immersion into the Bible and a life of trying with all its trial and error. Mr. Robinson is just such a man. Mr. Moyer had decades of interaction with Mr. Robinson and he was able to strike the…

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Review: A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs

“I recommend this volume for its thoroughness. The breadth and depth of topics covered is immense. This is fantastic for a time period we do not know much (or enough!) about.”

For more information about A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs, check out our website as well as the below review!

The Blog of a Wanna-Be Pastor

A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs is of immense value to the student of the history of Christianity and what early Christians believed. Debates continue today about what these early Christians believed. No doubt scholarship has progressed in this field, for which I am thankful. Yet, people always look for the “classics” to possess on one’s bookshelf. For example, Karl Barth’s Dogmatics is a classic in Protestantism. Or for our Catholic friends, volumes of Aquinas’s Summa. For a more conservative, Calvinistic Reformed position, Charles Hodge’s Systematic Theology or Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics top the field. In the study of early Christianity and what they believed, there are few volumes I would recommend, but this is one of them.

First, I recommend this volume for its thoroughness. The breadth and depth of topics covered is immense. This is fantastic for a time period we do not know much (or enough!)…

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